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Massive sulfide metallogenesis at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered spreading axis: evidence from the Franciscan complex and contemporary analogues

Geology

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Abstract

The Island Mountain deposit, an anomalous massive sulfide in the Central belt of the Franciscan complex, formed during hydrothermal activity in a sediment-dominated paleo-sea-floor environment. Although the base of the massive sulfide is juxtaposed against a 500-m-wide melange band, its gradational upper contact within a coherent sequence of sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone indicates that hydrothermal activity was concurrent with turbidite deposition. The bulk composition of sulfide samples is consistent with a hydrothermal system dominated by fluid-sediment interaction. On the basis of a comparison with possible contemporary tectonic analogues at the southern Gorda Ridge and the Chile margin triple junction, it is proposed that massive sulfide mineralization resulted from hydrothermal activity at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered ridge axis prior to collision with the North American plate. -from Authors

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Massive sulfide metallogenesis at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered spreading axis: evidence from the Franciscan complex and contemporary analogues
Series title:
Geology
Volume
21
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1993
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Geology
First page:
137
Last page:
140