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Flooding in southeastern United States from tropical storm Alberto, July 1994

Destructive water: water-caused natural disasters, their abatement and control. Proc. international conference, California, 1996

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Edited by:
Leavesley G.H.

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Abstract

In July 1994, parts of central and southwestern Georgia, southeastern Albama, and the western panhandle of Florida were devastated by floods resulting from rainfall produced by Tropical Storm Alberto. Entire communities were inundated by flood waters as numerous streams reached peak stages and discharges far greater than previous floods in the Flint, Ocmulgee, and Choctawhatchee River basins. The flooding resulted in 33 deaths in towns and small communities along or near the overflowing streams. President Clinton declared 78 counties as Federal disaster areas; 55 in Georgia, 10 in Alabama, and 13 in Florida. The Flint River and Ocmulgee River basins in Georgi experienced floods that exceeded the 100-year recurrence interval discharge along almost their entire lengths. Travel was disrupted as railroad and highway bridges and culverts were overtopped and, in many cases, washed out. Total food damages to public and private property were estimated at near $1 billion dollars. The destruction caused by this storm serves to emphasize the high cost imposed upon life and property by flood disasters; and thus, highlight the importance of preparing for, monitoring, and documenting such occurrences.In July 1994, parts of central and southwestern Georgia, southeastern Alabama, and the western panhandle of Florida were devastated by floods resulting from rainfall produced by Tropical Storm Alberto. Entire communities were inundated by flood waters as numerous streams reached peak stages and discharges far greater than previous floods in the Flint, Ocmulgee, and Choctawhatchee River basins. The flooding resulted in 33 deaths in towns and small communities along or near the overflowing streams. President Clinton declared 78 counties as Federal disaster areas: 55 in Georgia, 10 in Alabama, and 13 in Florida. The Flint River and Ocmulgee River basins in Georgia experienced floods that exceeded the 100-year recurrence interval discharge along almost their entire lengths. Travel was disrupted as railroad and highway bridges and culverts were overtopped an, in many cases, washed out. Total flood damages to public and private property were estimated at nearly $1 billion dollars. The destruction caused by this storm serves to emphasize the high cost imposed upon life and property by flood disasters; and thus, highlight the importance of preparing for, monitoring, and documenting such occurrences.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Flooding in southeastern United States from tropical storm Alberto, July 1994
Series title:
Destructive water: water-caused natural disasters, their abatement and control. Proc. international conference, California, 1996
Issue:
239
Year Published:
1997
Language:
English
Publisher:
IAHS; Publication
Publisher location:
239, Wallingford, United Kingdom
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Destructive water: water-caused natural disasters, their abatement and control. Proc. international conference, California, 1996
First page:
33
Last page:
38
Number of Pages:
6
Conference Title:
Proceedings of the 1996 International Conference on Destructive Water: Water-Caused Natural Disasters, their Abatement and Control
Conference Location:
Anaheim, CA, USA
Conference Date:
24 June 1996 through 28 June 1996