thumbnail

Late quaternary regional geoarchaeology of Southeast Alaska Karst: A progress report

Geoarchaeology - An International Journal

By:
, , , , , and

Links

  • The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time
  • Download citation as: RIS

Abstract

Karst systems, sea caves, and rock shelters within the coastal temperate rain forest of Alaska's Alexander Archipelago preserve important records of regional archaeology, sea level history, glacial and climatic history, and vertebrate paleontology. Two 14C AMS dates on human bone discovered in a remote cave (49-PET-408) on Prince of Wales Island document the oldest reliably dated human in Alaska to ca. 9800 B.P. A series of 14C AMS dates from cave deposits span the past 40,000 years and provide the first evidence of Pleistocene faunas from the northwest coast of North America. Other discoveries include sea caves and marine beach deposits elevated above modern sea level, extensive solution caves, and mammalian remains of species previously undocumented within the region. Records of human activity, including cave art, artifacts, and habitation sites may provide new insights into the early human colonization of the Americas. ??1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Late quaternary regional geoarchaeology of Southeast Alaska Karst: A progress report
Series title:
Geoarchaeology - An International Journal
Volume
12
Issue:
6
Year Published:
1997
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Geoarchaeology - An International Journal
First page:
689
Last page:
712
Number of Pages:
24