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Application of the surface complexation concept to complex mineral assemblages

Environmental Science and Technology

By:
, , , and
DOI: 10.1021/es980312q

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Abstract

Two types of modeling approaches are illustrated for describing inorganic contaminant adsorption in aqueous environments: (a) the component additivity approach and (b) the generalized composite approach. Each approach is applied to simulate Zn2+ adsorption by a well-characterized sediment collected from an aquifer at Cape Cod, MA. Zn2+ adsorption by the sediment was studied in laboratory batch experiments with a range of pH and Zn(II) concentrations selected to encompass conditions observed in the aquifer. In the generalized composite approach, one, and two-site surface complexation model parameters were calibrated with the experimental data using FITEQL. The pH dependence of Zn2+ adsorption was simulated without explicit representation of electrostatic energy terms. Surface acidity constants and ion pair formation by major electrolyte ions were also not required in the model thereby minimizing the number of fitted parameters. Predictions of Zn2+ adsorption with the component additivity modeling approach did not simulate the experimental data adequately without manipulation of surface area or site density parameter values. To apply the component additivity approach to environmental sorbents, further research is needed to better characterize the composition of sediment surface coatings. The generalized composite modeling approach requires less information and can be viewed as more practical for application within solute transport models. With only three adjustable parameters, this approach could simulate Zn2+ adsorption over a range of chemical conditions that would cause several orders of magnitude variation in the distribution coefficient (K(d)) for Zn2+ within the aquifer.Two types of modeling approaches are illustrated for describing inorganic contaminant adsorption in aqueous environments: (a) the component additivity approach and (b) the generalized composite approach. Each approach is applied to simulate Zn2+ adsorption by a well-characterized sediment collected from an aquifer at Cape Cod, MA. Zn2+ adsorption by the sediment was studied in laboratory batch experiments with a range of pH and Zn(II) concentrations selected to encompass conditions observed in the aquifer. In the generalized composite approach, one- and two-site surface complexation model parameters were calibrated with the experimental data using FITEQL. The pH dependence of Zn2+ adsorption was simulated without explicit representation of electrostatic energy terms. Surface acidity constants and ion pair formation by major electrolyte ions were also not required in the model, thereby minimizing the number of fitted parameters. Predictions of Zn2+ adsorption with the component additivity modeling approach did not simulate the experimental data adequately without manipulation of surface area or site density parameter values. To apply the component additivity approach to environmental sorbents, further research is needed to better characterize the composition of sediment surface coatings. The generalized composite modeling approach requires less information and can be viewed as more practical for application within solute transport models. With only three adjustable parameters, this approach could simulate Zn2+ adsorption over a range of chemical conditions that would cause several orders of magnitude variation in the distribution coefficient (Kd) for Zn2+ within the aquifer.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Application of the surface complexation concept to complex mineral assemblages
Series title:
Environmental Science and Technology
DOI:
10.1021/es980312q
Volume
32
Issue:
19
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Publisher:
ACS
Publisher location:
Washington, DC, United States
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Environmental Science and Technology
First page:
2820
Last page:
2828