thumbnail

Microbial oxidation of elemental selenium in soil slurries and bacterial cultures

Environmental Science and Technology

By:
and
DOI: 10.1021/es970940s

Links

Abstract

The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(O)] was studied by employing 75Se(O) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(O) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(O) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(O) oxidation ranged from 0.0009 to 0.0117 day-1 which were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for dissimilatory Se(VI) reduction in organic-rich, anoxic sediments.The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(0)] was studied by employing 75Se(0) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(O) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(O) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(O) oxidation ranged from 0.0009 to 0.0117 day-1 which were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for dissimilatory Se(VI) reduction in organic-rich, anoxic sediments.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Microbial oxidation of elemental selenium in soil slurries and bacterial cultures
Series title:
Environmental Science and Technology
DOI:
10.1021/es970940s
Volume
32
Issue:
23
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Publisher:
ACS
Publisher location:
Washington, DC, United States
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Environmental Science and Technology
First page:
3749
Last page:
3755
Number of Pages:
7