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Surfactant-enhanced remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer. 2. Transport of TCE

Environmental Science and Technology

By:
, , ,
DOI: 10.1021/es970722z

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Abstract

Field studies were conducted under an induced gradient in a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, to study (a) the rate-limited desorption of TCE from aquifer sediments to water and (b) the effect of a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the desorption and transport of TCE. Clean water was injected into the contaminated aquifer for 206 day. Triton X-100 was added for a 36-day period (days 36-71 from the start of clean water injection). The effect of Triton X-100 on the desorption and transport of TCE in the field was examined by observing the concentrations of these two solutes in four monitoring wells 3-9 m from the injection wells. These data show a small but discernible increase in the TCE concentration in two of the wells corresponding approximately to the time when surfactant reaches the wells; in the other two monitoring wells, the increase in TCE concentration is negligible. A solute transport model that assumes local sorption equilibrium and used a laboratory-derived distribution coefficient could not adequately describe TCE desorption and transport observed in the aquifer. Two model formulations that accounted for rate-limited sorption - two-site and multisite models - fit the data well. TCE concentrations after surfactant injection were underpredicted by the models unless mass transfer rate was increased to account for the effect of surfactant on the rate of TCE desorption. The concentration data from the two wells and the model analysis suggest that the rate of TCE desorption is increased (by approximately 30%) as a result of Triton X-100 injection.Field studies were conducted under an induced gradient in a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, to study (a) the rate-limited desorption of TCE from aquifer sediments to water and (b) the effect of a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the desorption and transport of TCE. Clean water was injected into the contaminated aquifer for 206 day. Triton X-100 was added for a 36-day period (days 36-71 from the start of clean water injection). The effect of Triton X-100 on the desorption and transport of TCE in the field was examined by observing the concentrations of these two solutes in four monitoring wells 3-9 m from the injection wells. These data show a small but discernible increase in the TCE concentration in two of the wells corresponding approximately to the time when surfactant reaches the wells; in the other two monitoring wells, the increase in TCE concentration is negligible. A solute transport model that assumes local sorption equilibrium and used a laboratory-derived distribution coefficient could not adequately describe TCE desorption and transport observed in the aquifer. Two model formulations that accounted for rate-limited sorption - two-site and multisite models - fit the data well. TCE concentrations after surfactant injection were underpredicted by the models unless mass transfer rate was increased to account for the effect of surfactant on the rate of TCE desorption. The concentration data from the two wells and the model analysis suggest that the rate of TCE desorption is increased (by approximately 30%) as a result of Triton X-100 injection.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Surfactant-enhanced remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer. 2. Transport of TCE
Series title:
Environmental Science and Technology
DOI:
10.1021/es970722z
Volume
32
Issue:
11
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Publisher:
ACS
Publisher location:
Washington, DC, United States
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
1686
Last page:
1693
Number of Pages:
8