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The clementine bistatic radar experiment: Evidence for ice on the moon

Solar System Research

By:
, , , , , , ,

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Abstract

Ice deposits, derived from comets and water-bearing meteorites hitting the Moon over geological times, have long been postulated to exist in dark areas near the poles of the Moon. The characteristics of radio waves beamed from the Clementine spacecraft into the polar areas, reflected from the Moon's surface, and received on the large dish antennas of the Deep Space Network here on Earth show that roughly the volume of a small lake (???0.9-1.8 km3) of water ice makes up part of the Moon's surface layer near the south pole. The discovery of ice near the lunar south pole has important ramifications for a permanent return to the Moon. These deposits could be used to manufacture rocket propellant and to support human life on the Moon. ?? 1998 MAHK Hayka/Interperiodica Publishing.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
The clementine bistatic radar experiment: Evidence for ice on the moon
Series title:
Solar System Research
Volume
32
Issue:
1
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Solar System Research
First page:
17
Last page:
22
Number of Pages:
6