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Nonpoint sources of volatile organic compounds in urban areas - Relative importance of land surfaces and air

Environmental Pollution

By:
and
DOI: 10.1016/S0269-7491(98)00048-7

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Abstract

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly detected in urban waters across the United States include gasoline-related compounds (e.g. toluene, xylene) and chlorinated compounds (e.g. chloroform, tetrachloroethane [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE]). Statistical analysis of observational data and results of modeling the partitioning of VOCs between air and water suggest that urban land surfaces are the primary nonpoint source of most VOCs. Urban air is a secondary nonpoint source, but could be an important source of the gasoline oxygenate methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE). Surface waters in urban areas would most effectively be protected by controlling land-surface sources.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Nonpoint sources of volatile organic compounds in urban areas - Relative importance of land surfaces and air
Series title:
Environmental Pollution
DOI:
10.1016/S0269-7491(98)00048-7
Volume
101
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Environmental Pollution
First page:
221
Last page:
230
Number of Pages:
10