thumbnail

Hypothesis of historical effects from selenium on endangered fish in the Colorado River basin

Human and Ecological Risk Assessment

By:
DOI: 10.1080/10807039.1999.10518884

Links

Abstract

Anthropogenic selenium contamination of aquatic ecosystems was first associated with cooling reservoirs of coal-fired power plants in the late 1970s, and later with drainage water from agricultural irrigation activities in the 1980s. In the 1990s, selenium contamination has been raised as a concern in the recovery of currently endangered fish in the Colorado River system. Widespread contamination from seleniferous drain waters from agriculture has been documented in the upper and lower Colorado River basins. Historically, irrigation started in the upper Colorado River basin in the late 1880s. In the 1930s, selenium concentrations in various drains, tributaries, and major rivers in the upper and lower Colorado River basins were in the 100s and 1000s of ??g/L. Native fish inhabiting large rivers such as the Colorado pikeminnow and razorback sucker were abundant before 1890, but became rare after 1910 to 1920, before the influence of mainstem reservoirs in the upper and lower Colorado River. A hypothesis is presented that selenium contamination of the tributaries and major rivers of the Colorado River basin in the 1890 to 1910 period caused the decline of the endangered fish and continues to inhibit their recovery. ?? 1999 by ASP.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Hypothesis of historical effects from selenium on endangered fish in the Colorado River basin
Series title:
Human and Ecological Risk Assessment
DOI:
10.1080/10807039.1999.10518884
Volume
5
Issue:
6
Year Published:
1999
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Human and Ecological Risk Assessment
First page:
1153
Last page:
1180
Number of Pages:
28