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Deglaciation and postglacial vegetation history of the West Mountains, west-central Idaho, USA

Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research

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Abstract

The West Mountains, west-central Idaho, were deglaciated before ca. 11,500 BP, as indicated by radiocarbon ages and Glacier Peak tephra, at several sites in cirques. Pollen analysis of a sediment core, and plant macrofossils from sediments recovered from the cirque at the head of Van Wyck Creek, indicate that a closed spruce-pine forest surrounded the site from ca. 11,500 to 9800 BP. Early in this period, spruce (probably krummholz) was already growing near the present-day altitudinal limit of large upright spruce. Hence, the climate during this period was significantly warmer than before 11,500 BP. Between ca. 9800 and 3200 BP the climate was warmer and drier than present. Pollen data indicate that from ca. 9300 to the time of Mazama tephra deposition (ca. 6700 BP), the climate was warmer and drier than at any time since 11,500 BP. From ca. 6700 to 3200 BP there was a small decrease in temperature with a minor increase in effective moisture. Beginning ca. 3200 BP, the climate was characterized by cooler temperatures and more mesic conditions. Modern plant communities were established by ca. 1500 BP.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Deglaciation and postglacial vegetation history of the West Mountains, west-central Idaho, USA
Series title:
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research
Volume
31
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1999
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research
First page:
303
Last page:
311
Number of Pages:
9