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A close-up look at Io from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer

Science

By:
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DOI: 10.1126/science.288.5469.1201

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Abstract

Infrared spectral images of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, acquired during the October and November 1999 and February 2000 flybys of the Galileo spacecraft, were used to study the thermal structure and sulfur dioxide distribution of active volcanoes. Loki Patera, the solar system's most powerful known volcano, exhibits large expanses of dark, cooling lava on its caldera floor. Prometheus, the site of long-lived plume activity, has two major areas of thermal emission, which support ideas of plume migration. Sulfur dioxide deposits were mapped at local scales and show a more complex relationship to surface colors than previously thought, indicating the presence of other sulfur compounds.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A close-up look at Io from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer
Series title:
Science
DOI:
10.1126/science.288.5469.1201
Volume
288
Issue:
5469
Year Published:
2000
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Science
First page:
1201
Last page:
1204
Number of Pages:
4