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Atmospheric transport, deposition, and fate of triazine herbicides and their metabolites in pristine areas at Isle Royale National Park

Environmental Science and Technology

By:
and
DOI: 10.1021/es000995l

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Abstract

Trace concentrations of triazine herbicides, used in the Midwestern United States, are being transported atmospherically hundreds of kilometers and deposited by precipitation onto pristine areas, such as Isle Royale National Park (Lake Superior). Atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and cyanazine were detected in Isle Royale rainfall from mid-May to early July (1992-1994) at concentrations of less than 0.005 to 1.8 ??g/L. Analysis of predominant wind direction indicated that the herbicides originated from the upper Midwestern United States. The annual mass of herbicides deposited by rainfall varied between years, from 13.4 ??g/m2/yr for 1992, 3.7 ??g/m2/yr for 1993, and 54 ??g/m2/yr for 1994. Atrazine and deethylatrazine were found also in concentrations of less than 5-22 ng/L in lakes across Isle Royale. Concentrations of atrazine in the surface layer of the lakes increased during deposition periods and decreased later in the year. The fate of triazines in shallow lakes suggests faster degradation and shorter half-lives, while deeper lakes have residence times for atrazine that may exceed 10 years.Trace concentrations of triazine herbicides, used in the Midwestern United States, are being transported atmospherically hundreds of kilometers and deposited by precipitation onto pristine areas, such as Isle Royale National Park (Lake Superior). Atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and cyanazine were detected in Isle Royale rainfall from mid-May to early July (1992-1994) at concentrations of less than 0.005 to 1.8 ??g/L. Analysis of predominant wind direction indicated that the herbicides originated from the upper Midwestern United States. The annual mass of herbicides deposited by rainfall varied between years, from 13.4 ??g/m2/yr for 1992, 3.7 ??g/m2/yr for 1993, and 54 ??g/m2/yr for 1994. Atrazine and deethylatrazine were found also in concentrations of less than 5-22 ng/L in lakes across Isle Royale. Concentrations of atrazine in the surface layer of the lakes increased during deposition periods and decreased later in the year. The fate of triazines in shallow lakes suggests faster degradation and shorter half-lives, while deeper lakes have residence times for atrazine that may exceed 10 years.Rainfall samples were collected at Isle Royale National Park, located in Lake Superior, and triazine herbicides were identified and quantified. Water samples were also collected from pristine lakes and analyzed for the presence of herbicides, and long-range atmospheric transport was determined using air-parcel, back-trajectory analysis. Results indicated that deposition was seasonal, with maximum concentrations occurring during the first week of June. Atrazine had the largest mass deposited on Isle Royal. Atrazine and deethylatrazine were the only herbicides detected in the surface-water samples. The annual mass of herbicides deposited by rainfall was calculated at 13.4, 3.7, and 54.0 ??g/m2, for 1992, 1993, and 1994, respectively. The source of the herbicides was attributed to Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, which are high-use areas for herbicides such as alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Atmospheric transport, deposition, and fate of triazine herbicides and their metabolites in pristine areas at Isle Royale National Park
Series title:
Environmental Science and Technology
DOI:
10.1021/es000995l
Volume
34
Issue:
15
Year Published:
2000
Language:
English
Publisher:
ACS
Publisher location:
Washington, DC, United States
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Environmental Science and Technology
First page:
3079
Last page:
3085
Number of Pages:
7