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African desert dust in the Caribbean atmosphere: Microbiology and public health

Aerobiologia

By:
, , , and
DOI: 10.1023/A:1011868218901

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Abstract

Air samples collected on St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands were screened for the presence of viable bacteria and fungi to determine if the number of cultivatable microbes in the atmosphere differed between "clear atmospheric conditions" and "African dust-events." Results indicate that during "African dust-events," the numbers of cultivatable airborne microorganisms can be 2 to 3 times that found during "clear atmospheric conditions." Direct microbial counts of air samples using an epifluorescent microscopy assay demonstrated that during an "African dust-event," bacteria-like and virus-like particle counts were approximately one log greater than during "clear atmospheric conditions." Bacteria-like particles exhibiting autofluoresence, a trait of phototrophs, were only detected during an "African dust-event.".

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
African desert dust in the Caribbean atmosphere: Microbiology and public health
Series title:
Aerobiologia
DOI:
10.1023/A:1011868218901
Volume
17
Issue:
3
Year Published:
2001
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Aerobiologia
First page:
203
Last page:
213