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Hierarchical programming for data storage and visualization

By:
and
Edited by:
Spaulding M.L.Spaulding M.L.

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Abstract

Graphics software is an essential tool for interpreting, analyzing, and presenting data from multidimensional hydrodynamic models used in estuarine and coastal ocean studies. The post-processing of time-varying three-dimensional model output presents unique requirements for data visualization because of the large volume of data that can be generated and the multitude of time scales that must be examined. Such data can relate to estuarine or coastal ocean environments and come from numerical models or field instruments. One useful software tool for the display, editing, visualization, and printing of graphical data is the Gr application, written by the first author for use in U.S. Geological Survey San Francisco Bay Program. The Gr application has been made available to the public via the Internet since the year 2000. The Gr application is written in the Java (Sun Microsystems, Nov. 29, 2001) programming language and uses the Extensible Markup Language standard for hierarchical data storage. Gr presents a hierarchy of objects to the user that can be edited using a common interface. Java's object-oriented capabilities allow Gr to treat data, graphics, and tools equally and to save them all to a single XML file.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Conference Paper
Publication Subtype:
Conference Paper
Title:
Hierarchical programming for data storage and visualization
ISBN:
0784406286
Year Published:
2001
Language:
English
Larger Work Title:
Estuarine and Coastal Modeling: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference
First page:
86
Last page:
102
Conference Title:
Estuarine and Coastal Modeling: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference
Conference Location:
St. Petersburg, FL
Conference Date:
5 November 2001 through 7 November 2001