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Feeding habits of the endangered Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens) relative to prey abundance

Acta Chiropterologica

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Abstract

Feeding habits of the endangered Ozark big-cared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens) in eastern Oklahoma, USA, were studied from July 1987 through July 1988. Diets were determined from microscopic analysis of fecal pellets and compared with arthropods collected in Malaise traps. Although lepidopterans comprised only 21.5% of the available prey, they occured in > 90% of the pellets examined and accounted for > 85% of the volume of prey consumed. Dipterans, coleopterans, and homopterans occured in 18.3%, 10,6%, and 6.7% of the feces, respectively, but each accounted for < 5% of the volume of prey consumed. Trichopterans, hymenopterans, and neuropterans also were found in feces but in trace amounts. Our results support the classification of C. t. ingens as a moth specialist, but additional insights are needed to fully understand how its feeding tactics conform to the allotonic frequency hypothesis (i.e., avoiding detection by cared moths). Conservation of this highly endangered North American bat will require, in part, maintenance of habitats capable of supporting abundant populations of Lepidoptera.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Feeding habits of the endangered Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens) relative to prey abundance
Series title:
Acta Chiropterologica
Volume
4
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2002
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Acta Chiropterologica
First page:
173
Last page:
182
Number of Pages:
10