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Anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, as prey for white perch, Morone americana

Hydrobiologia

By:
,
DOI: 10.1023/A:1021078803198

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Abstract

The reintroduction of anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, to their historic habitats in the inland waters of the United States and Canada, has prompted concerns about possible interactions with a popular sport fish, white perch, Morone americana. Both species are now widely distributed in northeastern North America. Diets of white perch in Lake George, Maine, U.S.A., where alewives were absent, were monitored and compared with those of white perch populations that were sympatric with anadromous alewives in two coastal Maine lakes, Biscay Pond and North Pond. In the presence of introduced alewives, the diet of adult white perch became almost exclusively juvenile alewives by late summer in ponds where both species were present. White perch that were sympatric with alewives were more piscivorus than were Lake George white perch, which primarily consumed Cladocera. Not only were alewives the principal prey item in the diet of white perch in Biscay and North ponds, but adult alewives were largely cannibalistic by August. Thus, success of reintroducing anadromous alewives in waters containing white perch may be negatively impacted by predation as well as cannibalism.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, as prey for white perch, Morone americana
Series title:
Hydrobiologia
DOI:
10.1023/A:1021078803198
Volume
479
Year Published:
2002
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Hydrobiologia
First page:
125
Last page:
130
Number of Pages:
6