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100 years of Pb deposition and transport in soils in Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A

Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

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DOI: 10.1023/A:1023957226204

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Abstract

In Illinois, atmospheric deposition is one major source of heavy metal inputs to agricultural land. The atmospheric Pb deposition and transport record in agricultural soils in Champaign, Illinois, was established by studying surface and subsurface soil samples collected during the past 100 years from the Morrow Plots on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Pb content in the soil samples was measured and the Ph deposition fluxes were calculated. The Pb content in surface soils increased sharply in the first half of the 20th century, and stayed invariant since. The maximum Pb flux from the atmosphere was estimated to be 27 (??14) ??g cm-2 yr-1 around 1940. The major pollution source for this increase probably was residential coal burning. It was estimated that in 50 yr, more than 50% of the Pb input had been lost from the surface soils.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
100 years of Pb deposition and transport in soils in Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A
Series title:
Water, Air, and Soil Pollution
DOI:
10.1023/A:1023957226204
Volume
146
Issue:
1-4
Year Published:
2003
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
197
Last page:
210
Number of Pages:
14