thumbnail

Spring onset in the Sierra Nevada: When is snowmelt independent of elevation?

Journal of Hydrometeorology

By:
, ,
DOI: 10.1175/1525-7541(2004)005<0327:SOITSN>2.0.CO;2

Links

Abstract

Short-term climate and weather systems can have a strong influence on mountain snowmelt, sometimes overwhelming the effects of elevation and aspect. Although most years exhibit a spring onset that starts first at lowest and moves to highest elevations, in spring 2002, flow in a variety of streams within the Tuolumne and Merced River basins of the southern Sierra Nevada all rose synchronously on 29 March. Flow in streams draining small high-altitude glacial subcatchments rose at the same time as that draining much larger basins gauged at lower altitudes, and streams from north- and south-facing cirques rose and fell together. Historical analysis demonstrates that 2002 was one among only 8 yr with such synchronous flow onsets during the past 87 yr, recognized by having simultaneous onsets of snowmelt at over 70% of snow pillow sites, having discharge in over 70% of monitored streams increase simultaneously, and having temperatures increase over 12??C within a 5-day period. Synchronous springs tend to begin with a low pressure trough over California during late winter, followed by the onset of a strong ridge and unusually warm temperatures. Synchronous springs are characterized by warmer than average winters and cooler than average March temperatures in California. In the most elevation-dependent, nonsynchronous years, periods of little or no storm activity, with warmer than average March temperatures, precede the onset of spring snowmelt, allowing elevation and aspect to influence snowmelt as spring arrives gradually. ?? 2004 American Meteorological Society.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Spring onset in the Sierra Nevada: When is snowmelt independent of elevation?
Series title:
Journal of Hydrometeorology
DOI:
10.1175/1525-7541(2004)005<0327:SOITSN>2.0.CO;2
Volume
5
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Hydrometeorology
First page:
327
Last page:
342
Number of Pages:
16