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A teleseismic study of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and implications for rapid strong-motion estimation

Earthquake Spectra

By:
, , and
DOI: 10.1193/1.1778388

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Abstract

Slip histories for the 2002 M7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake are derived rapidly from global teleseismic waveform data. In phases, three models improve matching waveform data and recovery of rupture details. In the first model (Phase I), analogous to an automated solution, a simple fault plane is fixed based on the preliminary Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor mechanism and the epicenter provided by the Preliminary Determination of Epicenters. This model is then updated (Phase II) by implementing a more realistic fault geometry inferred from Digital Elevation Model topography and further (Phase III) by using the calibrated P-wave and SH-wave arrival times derived from modeling of the nearby 2002 M6.7 Nenana Mountain earthquake. These models are used to predict the peak ground velocity and the shaking intensity field in the fault vicinity. The procedure to estimate local strong motion could be automated and used for global real-time earthquake shaking and damage assessment. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A teleseismic study of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and implications for rapid strong-motion estimation
Series title:
Earthquake Spectra
DOI:
10.1193/1.1778388
Volume
20
Issue:
3
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Earthquake Spectra
First page:
617
Last page:
637
Number of Pages:
21