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Landslides triggered by the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and the inferred nature of the strong shaking

Earthquake Spectra

By:
, , , and
DOI: 10.1193/1.1778173

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Abstract

The 2002 M7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake triggered thousands of landslides, primarily rock falls and rock slides, that ranged in volume from rock falls of a few cubic meters to rock avalanches having volumes as great as 15 ?? 106 m3. The pattern of landsliding was unusual; the number of slides was less than expected for an earthquake of this magnitude, and the landslides were concentrated in a narrow zone 30-km wide that straddled the fault rupture over its entire 300-km length. The large rock avalanches all clustered along the western third of the rupture zone where acceleration levels and ground-shaking frequencies are thought to have been the highest. Inferences about near-field strong shaking characteristics drawn from the interpretation of the landslide distribution are consistent with results of recent inversion modeling that indicate high-frequency energy generation was greatest in the western part of the fault rupture zone and decreased markedly to the east. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Landslides triggered by the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and the inferred nature of the strong shaking
Series title:
Earthquake Spectra
DOI:
10.1193/1.1778173
Volume
20
Issue:
3
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Earthquake Spectra
First page:
669
Last page:
691