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Late Quaternary evolution of channel and lobe complexes of Monterey Fan

Marine Geology

By:
,
DOI: 10.1016/j.margeo.2004.03.001

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Abstract

The modern Monterey submarine fan, one of the largest deep-water deposits off the western US, is composed of two major turbidite systems: the Neogene Lower Turbidite System (LTS) and the late Quaternary Upper Turbidite System (UTS). The areally extensive LTS is a distal deposit with low-relief, poorly defined channels, overbank, and lower-fan elements. The younger UTS comprises almost half of the total fan volume and was initiated in the late Pleistocene from canyons in the Monterey Bay area. Rapidly prograding high-relief, channel-levee complexes dominated deposition early in the UTS with periodic avulsion events. In the last few 100 ka, much of the sediment bypassed the northern fan as a result of allocyclic controls, and deposition is simultaneously occurring on a sandy lobe with low-relief channels and on an adjacent detached muddier lobe built from reconfinement of overbank flow from the northern high-relief channels. During the relatively short-lived UTS deposition, at least seven different channel types and two lobe types were formed. This study provides a significant reinterpretation of the depositional history of Monterey Fan by incorporating all available unpublished geophysical data. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Late Quaternary evolution of channel and lobe complexes of Monterey Fan
Series title:
Marine Geology
DOI:
10.1016/j.margeo.2004.03.001
Volume
206
Issue:
1-4
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
199
Last page:
223
Number of Pages:
25