thumbnail

Persistent disturbance by commercial navigation afters the relative abundance of channel-dwelling fishes in a large river

Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

By:
, ,
DOI: 10.1139/F06-129

Links

Abstract

We provide the first evidence for chronic effects of disturbance by commercial vessels on the spatial distribution and abundance of fishes in the channels of a large river. Most of the world's large rivers are intensively managed to satisfy increasing demands for commercial shipping, but little research has been conducted to identify and alleviate any adverse consequences of commercial navigation. We used a combination of a gradient sampling design incorporating quasicontrol areas with Akaike's information criterion (AIC)-weighted model averaging to estimate effects of disturbances by commercial vessels on fishes in the upper Mississippi River. Species density, which mainly measured species evenness, decreased with increasing disturbance frequency. The most abundant species - gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) - and the less abundant shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus) and flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) were seemingly unaffected by traffic disturbance. In contrast, the relative abundance of the toothed herrings (Hiodon spp.), redhorses (Moxostoma spp.), buffaloes (Ictiobus spp.), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), sauger (Sander canadensis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) decreased with increasing traffic in the navigation channel. We hypothesized that the combination of alteration of hydraulic features within navigation channels and rehabilitation of secondary channels might benefit channel-dependent species. ?? 2006 NRC.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Persistent disturbance by commercial navigation afters the relative abundance of channel-dwelling fishes in a large river
Series title:
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
DOI:
10.1139/F06-129
Volume
63
Issue:
11
Year Published:
2006
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
2418
Last page:
2433
Number of Pages:
16