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Survey and monitoring of species at risk at Camp Blanding Training Site, northeastern Florida

Southeastern Naturalist

By:
, ,
DOI: 10.1656/1528-7092(2006)5[473:SAMOSA]2.0.CO;2

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Abstract

We studied the presence and distribution of 19 species at risk in northeastern Florida at the Camp Blanding Training Site (CBTS) during 2000-2001, seven years after the first major baseline surveys of CBTS were conducted. Much of the training conducted at CBTS deals with light infantry exercises, but the site is also used for mining, silviculture, hunting, fishing, emergency logistical support, and entertainment purposes. CBTS contains more than 2000 species of plants and animals in 14 natural communities, each impacted to various degrees by past and current land management. Adaptive management plans for species may be ineffective without continual feedback and the flexibility for change. Here we summarize and discuss the results of our surveys, compare these results with those of past surveys, identify differences between the surveys, and discuss the importance of systematic protocols and study design for CBTS environmental managers.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Survey and monitoring of species at risk at Camp Blanding Training Site, northeastern Florida
Series title:
Southeastern Naturalist
DOI:
10.1656/1528-7092(2006)5[473:SAMOSA]2.0.CO;2
Volume
5
Issue:
3
Year Published:
2006
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Southeastern Naturalist
First page:
473
Last page:
498
Number of Pages:
26