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Wildlife as valuable natural resources vs. intolerable pests: A suburban wildlife management model

Urban Ecosystems

By:
,
DOI: 10.1007/s11252-005-4379-5

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Abstract

Management of wildlife in suburban environments involves a complex set of interactions between both human and wildlife populations. Managers need additional tools, such as models, that can help them assess the status of wildlife populations, devise and apply management programs, and convey this information to other professionals and the public. We present a model that conceptualizes how some wildlife populations can fluctuate between extremely low (rare, threatened, or endangered status) and extremely high (overabundant) numbers over time. Changes in wildlife abundance can induce changes in human perceptions, which continually redefine species as a valuable resource to be protected versus a pest to be controlled. Management programs thatincorporate a number of approaches and promote more stable populations of wildlife avoid the problems of the resource versus pest transformation, are less costly to society, and encourage more positive and less negative interactions between humans and wildlife. We presenta case example of the beaver Castor canadensis in Massachusetts to illustrate how this model functions and can be applied. ?? 2005 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Wildlife as valuable natural resources vs. intolerable pests: A suburban wildlife management model
Series title:
Urban Ecosystems
DOI:
10.1007/s11252-005-4379-5
Volume
8
Issue:
2 SPEC. ISS.
Year Published:
2005
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Urban Ecosystems
First page:
179
Last page:
190
Number of Pages:
12