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Widespread detection of N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide in U.S. streams: Comparison with concentrations of pesticides, personal care products, and other organic wastewater compounds

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

By:
, , , and
DOI: 10.1897/04-297R.1

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Abstract

One of the most frequently detected organic chemicals in a nationwide study concerning the effects of wastewater on stream water quality conducted in the year 2000 was the widely used insect repellant N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). It was detected at levels of 0.02 ??g/L or greater in 73% of the stream sites sampled, with the selection of sampling sites being biased toward streams thought to be subject to wastewater contamination (i.e., downstream from intense urbanization and livestock production). Although DEET frequently was detected at all sites, the median concentration was low (0.05 ??g/L). The highest concentrations of DEET were found in streams from the urban areas (maximum concentration, 1.1 ??g/L). The results of the present study suggest that the movement of DEET to streams through wastewater-treatment systems is an important mechanism that might lead to the exposure of aquatic organisms to this chemical. ?? 2005 SETAC.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Widespread detection of N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide in U.S. streams: Comparison with concentrations of pesticides, personal care products, and other organic wastewater compounds
Series title:
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
DOI:
10.1897/04-297R.1
Volume
24
Issue:
5
Year Published:
2005
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
First page:
1029
Last page:
1034