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Coral-gravel storm ridges: examples from the tropical Pacific and Caribbean

By:
and
DOI: 10.1061/40926(239)43

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Abstract

Extreme storms in reef environments have long been recognized as a mechanism for depositing ridges of reef-derived coarse clastic sediment. This study revisits the storm ridges formed by Tropical Cyclone Bebe on Funafuti, Tuvalu and Tropical Cyclone Ofa on Upolu, Western Samoa in the South Pacific, and Hurricane Lenny on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles in the Caribbean. Ridge characteristics produced by these storms include: heights of 1–4 m, widths of 8–50 m, and lengths up to 18 km. The ridges tend to be higher and steeper on their landward margins than on their seaward margins and are composed mostly of re-worked coral rubble derived from reef front settings with smaller amounts of fresh broken coral (5–30%). Characteristics of these modern gravel storm ridges can be used to help identify ancient storm deposits and to differentiate between other coarse-grained deposits such as those created by tsunamis.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Conference Paper
Publication Subtype:
Conference Paper
Title:
Coral-gravel storm ridges: examples from the tropical Pacific and Caribbean
ISBN:
0784409269; 9780784409268
DOI:
10.1061/40926(239)43
Year Published:
2007
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Society of Civil Engineers
Contributing office(s):
Coastal and Marine Geology Program
Description:
12 p.
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Conference publication
Larger Work Title:
Coastal Sediments '07 - Proceedings of 6th International Symposium on Coastal Engineering and Science of Coastal Sediment Processes
First page:
572
Last page:
583
Conference Title:
6th International Symposium on Coastal Engineering and Science of Coastal Sediment Processes
Conference Location:
New Orleans, LA