thumbnail

QuakeCaster, an earthquake physics demonstration and exploration tool

Seismological Research Letters

By:
,
DOI: 10.1785/gssrl.83.1.150

Links

Abstract

A fundamental riddle of earthquake occurrence is that tectonic motions at plate interiors are steady, changing only subtly over millions of years, but at plate boundary faults, the plates are stuck for hundreds of years and then suddenly jerk forward in earthquakes. Why does this happen? The answer, as formulated by Harry F. Reid (Reid 1910, 192) is that the Earth’s crust is elastic, behaving like a very stiff slab of rubber sliding over a substrate of “honey”-like asthenosphere, and that faults are restrained by friction. The crust near the faults—zones of weakness that separate the plates—slowly deforms, building up stress until frictional resistance on the fault is overcome and the fault suddenly slips. For the past century, scientists have sought ways to use this knowledge to forecast earthquakes.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
QuakeCaster, an earthquake physics demonstration and exploration tool
Series title:
Seismological Research Letters
DOI:
10.1785/gssrl.83.1.150
Volume
83
Issue:
1
Year Published:
2012
Language:
English
Publisher:
Seismological Society of America
Publisher location:
El Cerrito, CA
Contributing office(s):
Earthquake Science Center
Description:
6 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Seismological Research Letters
First page:
150
Last page:
155