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Probabilistic assessment of beach and dune changes

By:
, , , , ,
DOI: 10.1061/40549(276)236

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Abstract

The recent availability of spatially-dense airborne lidar data makes assessment of the vulnerability of beaches and dunes to storm impacts practical over long reaches of coast. As an initial test, elevations of the tops (D high) and bases (Dlow) of foredune ridges along a 55-km reach on the northern Outer Banks, NC were found to have considerable spatial variability suggesting that different parts of the barrier island would respond differently to storms. Comparing statistics of storm wave runup to D high and Dlow, we found that net erosion due to overwash and dune retreat should be greatest at the northern and southern ends of the study area and least in the central section. This predicted spatial pattern of storm-induced erosion is similar to the spatial pattern of long-term erosion of the shoreline which may be controlled by additional processes (such as gradients in longshore transport) as well as the cross-shore processes considered here. However, consider feedback where at erosional hot spots there is a deficit of sand (caused by gradients in longshore transport) which lead to lower dunes and enhanced erosional cross-shore processes, such as overwash. Hence, the erosional hot spots would be exacerbated, further increasing the vulnerability of the beach and dunes to net erosion.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Conference Paper
Publication Subtype:
Conference Paper
Title:
Probabilistic assessment of beach and dune changes
ISBN:
0784405492; 9780784405499
DOI:
10.1061/40549(276)236
Volume
276
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Larger Work Title:
Coastal Engineering 2000 - Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Coastal Engineering, ICCE 2000
First page:
3035
Last page:
3047
Number of Pages:
13
Conference Title:
Coastal Engineering 2000 - 27th International Conference on Coastal Engineering, ICCE 2000
Conference Location:
Sydney, NSW
Conference Date:
16 July 2000 through 21 July 2000