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Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

North American Journal of Fisheries Management

By:
and
DOI: 10.1577/M07-211.1

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Abstract

The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50??C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments
Series title:
North American Journal of Fisheries Management
DOI:
10.1577/M07-211.1
Volume
28
Issue:
5
Year Published:
2008
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
North American Journal of Fisheries Management
First page:
1597
Last page:
1600
Country:
United States
State:
Wisconsin
Other Geospatial:
Lake Onalaska
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
N