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Experimental infection of cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) with varying doses of West Nile virus

American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

By:
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DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.2009.09-0136

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Abstract

Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) were inoculated with differing doses of West Nile virus (WNV) to evaluate their potential role as reservoir hosts in nature. Swallows often nest in large colonies in habitats and months associated with high mosquito abundance and early WNV transmission in North America. Additionally, cliff swallow diet consists of insects, including mosquitoes, leading to an additional potential route of WNV infection. The average peak viremia titer among infected cliff swallows was 106.3 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL serum and the reservoir competence index was 0.34. There was no correlation between dose and probability of becoming infected or viremia peak and duration. Oral shedding was detected from 2 to 14 days post-inoculation with an average peak titer of 1044 PFU/swab. These results suggest that cliff swallows are competent reservoir hosts of WNV and therefore, they may play a role in early seasonal amplification and maintenance of WNV. Copyright ?? 2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Experimental infection of cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) with varying doses of West Nile virus
Series title:
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.2009.09-0136
Volume
81
Issue:
6
Year Published:
2009
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
First page:
1159
Last page:
1164