thumbnail

Toward immunogenetic studies of amphibian chytridiomycosis: Linking innate and acquired immunity

BioScience

By:
, , ,
DOI: 10.1525/bio.2009.59.4.9

Links

Abstract

Recent declines in amphibian diversity and abundance have contributed significantly to the global loss of biodiversity. The fungal disease chytridiomycosis is widely considered to be a primary cause of these declines, yet the critical question of why amphibian species differ in susceptibility remains unanswered. Considerable evidence links environmental conditions and interspecific variability of the innate immune system to differential infection responses, but other sources of individual, population, or species-typical variation may also be important. In this article we review the preliminary evidence supporting a role for acquired immune defenses against chytridiomycosis, and advocate for targeted investigation of genes controlling acquired responses, as well as those that functionally bridge the innate and acquired immune systems. Immunogenetic data promise to answer key questions about chytridiomycosis susceptibility and host-pathogen coevolution, and will draw much needed attention to the importance of considering evolutionary processes in amphibian conservation management and practice. ?? 2009 by American Institute of Biological Sciences.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Toward immunogenetic studies of amphibian chytridiomycosis: Linking innate and acquired immunity
Series title:
BioScience
DOI:
10.1525/bio.2009.59.4.9
Volume
59
Issue:
4
Year Published:
2009
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
BioScience
First page:
311
Last page:
320
Number of Pages:
10