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A common-garden study of resource-island effects on a native and an exotic, annual grass after fire

Rangeland Ecology and Management

By:
,
DOI: 10.2111/REM-D-11-00026.1

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Abstract

Plant-soil variation related to perennial-plant resource islands (coppices) interspersed with relatively bare interspaces is a major source of heterogeneity in desert rangelands. Our objective was to determine how native and exotic grasses vary on coppice mounds and interspaces (microsites) in unburned and burned sites and underlying factors that contribute to the variation in sagebrush-steppe rangelands of the Idaho National Lab, where interspaces typically have abiotic crusts. We asked how the exotic cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) and native bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata [Pursh] A. Löve) were distributed among the microsites and measured their abundances in three replicate wildfires and nearby unburned areas. We conducted a common-garden study in which soil cores from each burned microsite type were planted with seed of either species to determine microsite effects on establishment and growth of native and exotic grasses. We assessed soil physical properties in the common-garden study to determine the intrinsic properties of each microsite surface and the retention of microsite soil differences following transfer of soils to the garden, to plant growth, and to wetting/drying cycles. In the field study, only bluebunch wheatgrass density was greater on coppice mounds than interspaces, in both unburned and burned areas. In the common-garden experiment, there were microsite differences in soil physical properties, particularly in crust hardness and its relationship to moisture, but soil properties were unaffected by plant growth. Also in the experiment, both species had equal densities yet greater dry mass production on coppice-mound soils compared to interspace soils, suggesting microsite differences in growth but not establishment (likely related to crust weakening resulting from watering). Coppice-interspace patterning and specifically native-herb recovery on coppices is likely important for postfire resistance of this rangeland to cheatgrass.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A common-garden study of resource-island effects on a native and an exotic, annual grass after fire
Series title:
Rangeland Ecology and Management
DOI:
10.2111/REM-D-11-00026.1
Volume
65
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2012
Language:
English
Publisher:
Society for Range Management
Publisher location:
Wheat Ridge, CO
Contributing office(s):
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description:
11 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Rangeland Ecology and Management
First page:
160
Last page:
170
Country:
United States
State:
Idaho