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Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union

By:
, , , , , , , , , ,
DOI: 10.1029/2010EO130002

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Abstract

Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano
Series title:
Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
DOI:
10.1029/2010EO130002
Volume
91
Issue:
13
Year Published:
2010
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s):
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Description:
1 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
118
Last page:
118
Country:
United States
State:
Hawai'i
Other Geospatial:
Kilauea Volcano