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Explaining reported puma-related behaviors and behavioral intentions among northern Arizona residents

Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal

By:
and
DOI: 10.1080/10871209.2012.627581

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Abstract

Management of pumas in the American West is typified by conflict among stakeholders plausibly rooted in life experiences and worldviews. We used a mail questionnaire to assess demographics, nature-views, puma-related life experiences and behaviors, and support for puma-related policies among residents of northern Arizona. Data from the questionnaire (nā€‰=ā€‰693 respondents) were used to model behaviors and support for policies. Compared to models based on nature-views and life experiences, those based on demographics had virtually no support from the data. The Utilitarian/Dominionistic nature-view had the strongest effect of any variable in six of seven models, and was associated with firearms and opposition to policies that would limit killing pumas. The Humanistic/Moralistic nature-view was positively associated with non-lethal behaviors and policies in five models. Gender had the strongest effect of any demographic variable. Compared to demographics alone, our results suggest that worldviews provide a more meaningful explanation of reported human behaviors and behavioral intentions regarding pumas.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Explaining reported puma-related behaviors and behavioral intentions among northern Arizona residents
Series title:
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal
DOI:
10.1080/10871209.2012.627581
Volume
17
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2012
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Contributing office(s):
Southwest Biological Science Center
Description:
21 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal
First page:
91
Last page:
111
Country:
United States
State:
Arizona