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Self-reporting bias in Chinook salmon sport fisheries in Idaho: implications for roving creel surveys

North American Journal of Fisheries Management

By:
, ,
DOI: 10.1080/02755947.2013.808293

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Abstract

Self-reporting bias in sport fisheries of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho was quantified by comparing observed and angler-reported data. A total of 164 observed anglers fished for 541 h and caught 74 Chinook Salmon. Fifty-eight fish were harvested and 16 were released. Anglers reported fishing for 604 h, an overestimate of 63 h. Anglers reported catching 66 fish; four less harvested and four less released fish were reported than observed. A Monte Carlo simulation revealed that when angler-reported data were used, total catch was underestimated by 14–15 fish (19–20%) using the ratio-of-means estimator to calculate mean catch rate. Negative bias was reduced to six fish (8%) when the means-of-ratio estimator was used. Multiple linear regression models to predict reporting bias in time fished had poor predictive value. However, actual time fished and a categorical covariate indicating whether the angler fished continuously during their fishing trip were two variables that were present in all of the top a priori models evaluated. Underreporting of catch and overreporting of time fished by anglers present challenges when managing Chinook Salmon sport fisheries. However, confidence intervals were near target levels and using more liberal definitions of angling when estimating effort in creel surveys may decrease sensitivity to bias in angler-reported data.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Self-reporting bias in Chinook salmon sport fisheries in Idaho: implications for roving creel surveys
Series title:
North American Journal of Fisheries Management
DOI:
10.1080/02755947.2013.808293
Volume
33
Issue:
4
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Contributing office(s):
Coop Res Unit Seattle
Description:
9 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
723
Last page:
731
Country:
United States