thumbnail

Conifer seedling recruitment across a gradient from forest to alpine tundra: effects of species, provenance, and site

Plant Ecology and Diversity

By:
, , , , and
DOI: 10.1080/17550874.2012.716087

Links

Abstract

Background: Seedling germination and survival is a critical control on forest ecosystem boundaries, such as at the alpine–treeline ecotone. In addition, while it is known that species respond individualistically to the same suite of environmental drivers, the potential additional effect of local adaptation on seedling success has not been evaluated. Aims: To determine whether local adaptation may influence the position and movement of forest ecosystem boundaries, we quantified conifer seedling recruitment in common gardens across a subalpine forest to alpine tundra gradient at Niwot Ridge, Colorado, USA. Methods: We studied Pinus flexilis and Picea engelmannii grown from seed collected locally at High (3400 m a.s.l.) and Low (3060 m a.s.l.) elevations. We monitored emergence and survival of seeds sown directly into plots and survival of seedlings germinated indoors and transplanted after snowmelt. Results: Emergence and survival through the first growing season was greater for P. flexilis than P. engelmannii and for Low compared with High provenances. Yet survival through the second growing season was similar for both species and provenances. Seedling emergence and survival tended to be greatest in the subalpine forest and lowest in the alpine tundra. Survival was greater for transplants than for field-germinated seedlings. Conclusions: These results suggest that survival through the first few weeks is critical to the establishment of natural germinants. In addition, even small distances between seed sources can have a significant effect on early demographic performance – a factor that has rarely been considered in previous studies of tree recruitment and species range shifts.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Conifer seedling recruitment across a gradient from forest to alpine tundra: effects of species, provenance, and site
Series title:
Plant Ecology and Diversity
DOI:
10.1080/17550874.2012.716087
Volume
6
Issue:
3-4
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis Group
Contributing office(s):
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description:
12 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Plant Ecology and Diversity
First page:
307
Last page:
318
Number of Pages:
12
Country:
United States
State:
Colorado