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Tampa Bay: Chapter N

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Abstract

Tampa Bay is Florida’s largest open-water estuary and encompasses an area of approximately 1036 km2 (400 mi2) (Burgan and Engle, 2006; TBNEP, 2006). The Bay’s watershed drains 5,698 km2 (2,200 mi2) of land and includes freshwater from the Hillsborough River to the north east, the Alafia and Little Manatee rivers to the east, and the Manatee River to the south (Figure 1). Freshwater inflow also enters the bay from the Lake Tarpon Canal, from small tidal tributaries, and from watershed runoff. Outflow travels from the upper bay segments (Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay) into Middle and Lower Tampa Bay. Southwestern portions of the water shed flow through Boca Ciega Bay into the Intracoastal Waterway and through the Southwest Channel and Passage Key Inlet into the Gulf of Mexico. The average depth in most of Tampa Bay is only 3.4 m (11 ft); however, 129 km (80 mi) of shipping channels with a maximum depth of 13.1 m (43 ft) have been dredged over time and are regularly maintained. These channels help to support the three ports within the bay, as well as commercial and recreational boat traffic.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Book chapter
Publication Subtype:
Book Chapter
Title:
Tampa Bay: Chapter N
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
18 p.
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Other Government Series
Larger Work Title:
Emergent Wetlands Status and Trends in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, 1950-2010
Country:
United States
State:
Florida