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Geology and ground-water resources of the Walla Walla River basin Washington-Oregon

Water Supply Bulletin 21

Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, Ground Water Branch, the Office of the State Engineer of Oregon, and the Board of County Commissioners of Walla Walla County, Washington
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Abstract

The Walla Walla River, whose drainage basin of about 1,330 square miles lies astride the Washington-Oregon boundary, drains westward to empty into the Columbia River. The basin slopes from the 5,000-foot crest of the Blue Mountains through a structural and topographic basin to the terraced lands adjoining the Columbia River at an altitude of about 340 feet. The main unit of the topographic basin is the valley plain, commonly called the Walla Walla Valley, which descends from about 1,500 feet at the foot of the mountain slopes to about 500 feet in altitude where the river cuts through the bedrock ridge near Divide. In the Blue Mountains the streams flow in rockbound canyons. Beyond the canyons, near Milton-Freewater and Walla Walla, they pass onto the broad alluvial fans and the terrace lands of the valley.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
State/Local Government Series
Title:
Geology and ground-water resources of the Walla Walla River basin Washington-Oregon
Series title:
Water Supply Bulletin
Series number:
21
Year Published:
1965
Language:
English
Publisher:
Washington Department of Conservation
Publisher location:
Olympia, WA
Description:
151 p.; Maps: 4 Sheets
Country:
United States
State:
Washington;Oregon
Other Geospatial:
Walla Walla River