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Too risky to settle: avian community structure changes in response to perceived predation risk on adults and offspring

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

By:
, , ,
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.0762

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Abstract

Predation risk is widely hypothesized as an important force structuring communities, but this potential force is rarely tested experimentally, particularly in terrestrial vertebrate communities. How animals respond to predation risk is generally considered predictable from species life-history and natural-history traits, but rigorous tests of these predictions remain scarce. We report on a large-scale playback experiment with a forest bird community that addresses two questions: (i) does perceived predation risk shape the richness and composition of a breeding bird community? And (ii) can species life-history and natural-history traits predict prey community responses to different types of predation risk? On 9 ha plots, we manipulated cues of three avian predators that preferentially prey on either adult birds or offspring, or both, throughout the breeding season. We found that increased perception of predation risk led to generally negative responses in the abundance, occurrence and/or detection probability of most prey species, which in turn reduced the species richness and shifted the composition of the breeding bird community. Species-level responses were largely predicted from the key natural-history trait of body size, but we did not find support for the life-history theory prediction of the relationship between species' slow/fast life-history strategy and their response to predation risk.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Too risky to settle: avian community structure changes in response to perceived predation risk on adults and offspring
Series title:
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.2013.0762
Volume
280
Issue:
1764
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
Royal Society
Contributing office(s):
Southeast Ecological Science Center
Description:
8 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Number of Pages:
8
Time Range Start:
2010-02-01T12:00:00
Time Range End:
2010-08-31T12:00:00
Country:
United States
State:
Florida
Other Geospatial:
Ordway-swisher Biological Station