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Effects of sea-level rise on salt water intrusion near a coastal well field in southeastern Florida

Ground Water

By:
and
DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.01008.x

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Abstract

A variable-density groundwater flow and dispersive solute transport model was developed for the shallow coastal aquifer system near a municipal supply well field in southeastern Florida. The model was calibrated for a 105-year period (1900 to 2005). An analysis with the model suggests that well-field withdrawals were the dominant cause of salt water intrusion near the well field, and that historical sea-level rise, which is similar to lower-bound projections of future sea-level rise, exacerbated the extent of salt water intrusion. Average 2005 hydrologic conditions were used for 100-year sensitivity simulations aimed at quantifying the effect of projected rises in sea level on fresh coastal groundwater resources near the well field. Use of average 2005 hydrologic conditions and a constant sea level result in total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration of the well field exceeding drinking water standards after 70 years. When sea-level rise is included in the simulations, drinking water standards are exceeded 10 to 21 years earlier, depending on the specified rate of sea-level rise.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Effects of sea-level rise on salt water intrusion near a coastal well field in southeastern Florida
Series title:
Ground Water
DOI:
10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.01008.x
Volume
51
Issue:
5
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wiley
Contributing office(s):
Florida Water Science Center-Ft. Lauderdale
Description:
23 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Ground Water
First page:
781
Last page:
803
Country:
United States
State:
Florida
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
N