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Habitat heterogeneity and intraguild interactions modify distribution and injury rates in two coexisting genera of damselflies

Freshwater Biology

By:
, , and
DOI: 10.1111/fwb.12217

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Abstract

1. Sublethal effects of predation can affect both population and community structure. Despite this, little is known about how the frequency of injury varies in relation to habitat, aquatic community characteristics or between trophically similar, coexisting taxa. 2. In a tidal freshwater ecosystem, we first examined injuries (lamellar autotomy) of Enallagma and Ischnura damselfly larvae, which have unique behaviours and susceptibilities to predation, as a function of habitat type, body size and overall odonate density. We also examined relative abundance of these genera and potential anisopteran predators as a function of habitat type. 3. The frequency of injury to Enallagma was high when larvae were small and overall odonate density was high. For Ischnura, however, the frequency of injury depended on habitat and was high for small larvae in less disturbed habitats low on the shore. Ischnura were most frequently found in more disturbed habitats high on the shore, whereas Enallagma were more frequently found in less disturbed habitats low on the shore. 4. The relative importance of factors hypothesised to structure odonate communities varied between coexisting Enallagma and Ischnura. Distinctive distributions and patterns of injury for each genus provided new insights on the potential for intraguild interactions to modify habitat associations in tidal freshwater ecosystems.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Habitat heterogeneity and intraguild interactions modify distribution and injury rates in two coexisting genera of damselflies
Series title:
Freshwater Biology
DOI:
10.1111/fwb.12217
Volume
58
Issue:
11
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wiley
Contributing office(s):
Great Lakes Science Center
Description:
9 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Freshwater Biology
First page:
2380
Last page:
2388
Country:
United States
State:
Virginia
Other Geospatial:
Thompson Creek