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Mississippi Basin nitrogen flux believed to cause Gulf hypoxia

Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union

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DOI: 10.1029/00EO00244

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Abstract

An expanding hypoxic zone develops each spring and summer on the Louisiana-Texas shelf of the Gulf of Mexico, and nitrogen from the Mississippi River Basin has been implicated as one of the principal causes. Hypoxic conditions, which occur when dissolved oxygen concentrations are less than 2 mg/L, can cause stress or death in bottom-dwelling organisms that cannot leave the zone.


The mid-summer extent of the hypoxic zone has more than doubled since it was first systematically mapped in 1985 [Rabalais et al., 1999]. The largest hypoxic zone measured to date occurred in 1999, when it reached ∼20,000 km2, about the size of the state of New Jersey [Rabalais, 1999].

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Mississippi Basin nitrogen flux believed to cause Gulf hypoxia
Series title:
Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
DOI:
10.1029/00EO00244
Volume
81
Issue:
29
Year Published:
2000
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Description:
7 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
First page:
321
Last page:
327
Number of Pages:
7
Country:
United States
Other Geospatial:
Gulf Of Mexico;Mississippi River Basin