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New eyes in the sky measure glaciers and ice sheets

Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union

By:
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DOI: 10.1029/00EO00187

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Abstract

The mapping and measurement of glaciers and their changes are useful in predicting sea-level and regional water supply, studying hazards and climate change [Haeberli et al., 1998],and in the hydropower industry Existing inventories cover only about 67,000 of the world's estimated 160,000 glaciers and are based on data collected over 50 years or more [e.g.,Haeberli et al., 1998]. The data available have proven that small ice bodies are disappearing at an accelerating rate and that the Antarctic ice sheet and its fringing ice shelves are undergoing unexpected, rapid change. According to many glaciologists, much larger fluctuations in land ice—with vast implications for society—are possible in the coming decades and centuries due to natural and anthropogenic climate change [Oppenheimer, 1998].

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
New eyes in the sky measure glaciers and ice sheets
Series title:
Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
DOI:
10.1029/00EO00187
Volume
81
Issue:
24
Year Published:
2000
Language:
English
Description:
7 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
265
Last page:
271
Number of Pages:
7
Other Geospatial:
Antarctica