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Natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a freshwater wetland

By:
, ,
Edited by:
Bruce C. Alleman, Andrea Leeson

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Abstract

Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) occurs as ground water discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater wetland at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Field and laboratory results indicate that biotransformation in the anaerobic wetland sediments is an important attenuation process. Relatively high concentrations of the parent compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA) and low or undetectable concentrations of daughter products were measured in the aquifer. In contrast, relatively high concentrations of the daughter products cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (12DCE); vinyl chloride (VC); 1,1,2-trichloroethane (112TCA); and 1,2-dichloroethane (12DCA) were measured in ground water in the wetland sediments, although total VOC concentrations decreased upward from about 1 mu mol/L (micromoles per liter) at the base of the wetland sediments to less than 0.2 near the surface. Microcosm experiments showed that 12DCE and VC are produced from anaerobic degradation of both TCE and PCA; PCA degradation also produced 112TCA and 12DCA.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Conference Paper
Publication Subtype:
Conference Paper
Title:
Natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a freshwater wetland
Volume
3
Year Published:
1997
Language:
English
Publisher:
Battelle Press
Publisher location:
Columbus, OH
Description:
6 p.
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Conference publication
First page:
207
Last page:
212
Number of Pages:
6
Country:
United States
State:
Maryl
County:
Harford County