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The crowbar chronicles and other tales

Seismological Research Letters

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DOI: 10.1785/gssrl.80.5.615

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Abstract

The analysis of historical earthquakes often relies heavily on archival accounts describing the effects of shaking on structures and people. Newspaper articles are among the most common, useful, and easily found sources of information. Dramatic earthquake effects are almost certain to have made the news during historic times; the challenge for modern seismologists is not to be overly swayed by articles that focus on the most dramatic rather than the representative effects in a region. At the other end of the spectrum, rarely does a historical newspaper explicitly note that an earthquake was not felt in a certain area: it is not news when nothing happens. When earthquake effects are subtle, the vexing question is often, did they go unreported entirely?

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
The crowbar chronicles and other tales
Series title:
Seismological Research Letters
DOI:
10.1785/gssrl.80.5.615
Volume
80
Issue:
5
Year Published:
2009
Language:
English
Publisher:
Earthquake Lites
Contributing office(s):
Earthquake Science Center
Description:
2 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Seismological Research Letters
First page:
615
Last page:
616
Online Only (Y/N):
Y