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Use of remote-sensing techniques to survey the physical habitat of large rivers

By:
, , , , ,
Edited by:
Thomas A. Edsall, Thomas E. Behrendt, Gary Cholwek, Jeffrey W. Frey, Gregory W. Kennedy, Stephen B. Smith

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Abstract

Remote-sensing techniques that can be used to quantitatively characterize the physical habitat in large rivers in the United States where traditional survey approaches typically used in small- and medium-sized streams and rivers would be ineffective or impossible to apply. The state-of-the-art remote-sensing technologies that we discuss here include side-scan sonar, RoxAnn, acoustic Doppler current profiler, remotely operated vehicles and camera systems, global positioning systems, and laser level survey systems. The use of these technologies will permit the collection of information needed to create computer visualizations and hard copy maps and generate quantitative databases that can be used in real-time mode in the field to characterize the physical habitat at a study location of interest and to guide the distribution of sampling effort needed to address other habitat-related study objectives. This report augments habitat sampling and characterization guidance provided by Meador et al. (1993) and is intended for use primarily by U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment program managers and scientists who are documenting water quality in streams and rivers of the United States.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Unnumbered Series
Title:
Use of remote-sensing techniques to survey the physical habitat of large rivers
Year Published:
1997
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center
Publisher location:
Ann Arbor, MI
Contributing office(s):
Great Lakes Science Center
Description:
iv, 20 p.
First page:
1
Last page:
20
Number of Pages:
29
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
N