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Increased avian diseases with habitat change

By:
Edited by:
E.T. LaRoe, G.S. Farris, C.E. Puckett, P.D. Doran, M.J. Mac

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Abstract

Changes in disease patterns and trends reflect changing relationships between the affected species (host) and the causes of disease (agent). Host-agent interactions are closely linked to environmental factors that either enhance or reduce the potential for disease to occur. As a result, wildlife disease patterns and trends are, to a substantial extent, indicators of environmental quality and changing host-agent interactions within the environment being evaluated. The types, distribution, and frequency of diseases causing major avian die-offs have changed greatly during the 20th century. Too little is known to assess the changes of most avian diseases that result in chronic attrition rather than major die-offs, or about those that affect reproductive success, reduce body condition, or affect survival in other indirect ways. Nevertheless, the changing patterns and trends in highly visible avian diseases provide notice of problems needing attention. Information on the status of disease in wild birds was obtained from National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) evaluations of the cause of death for more than 30,000 carcasses from across the United States during the past two decades, reports of avian mortality received from collaborators, the scientific literature, and NWHC field investigations of bird mortality. Comprehensive assessments of causes of wild bird mortality, magnitude of losses, and geographic distribution of specific diseases are not possible from these data, although we can identify general relationships for waterfowl and some other species.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Other Report
Title:
Increased avian diseases with habitat change
Year Published:
1995
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Biological Service
Publisher location:
Washington, DC
Contributing office(s):
National Wildlife Health Center
Description:
p. 401-405
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
Other Report
First page:
401
Last page:
405
Number of Pages:
5