thumbnail

Availability of ground water at the border stations at Laurier and Ferry, Washington

Circular 422

By:

Links

Abstract

In the Laurier area, Washington, the Kettle River has cut into crystalline rocks in the deepest part of the valley. Sand and gravel fill were deposited in the valley during Pleistocene time by melt water from glaciers, and subsequent erosion and alluviation formed three terrace levels. The highest level, on which Laurier Border Station is situated is about 200 feet above present river level The intermediate terrace is 150 to 180 feet above river level. Wells on the intermediate terrace yield about 4 gpm (gallons per minute) per foot of drawdown. Larger yields probably could be obtained from wells on the lowest terrace (flood plain). In the Ferry area the valley fill of the Kettle River valley is as much as 150 feet thick and contains boulders that are as much as 18 inches in diameter. Small to moderate quantities of water probably would be available from wells on the high-terrace level. Large quantities of water are obtained from irrigation wells on the low terrace. The bedrock at both sites is relatively impermeable and probably would yield very meager supplies of water.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Availability of ground water at the border stations at Laurier and Ferry, Washington
Series title:
Circular
Series number:
422
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1960
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
[U.S. Geological Survey],
Description:
iii, 8 p. :illus., map, tables. ;27cm.