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Translocation of Endangered Laysan Ducks to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (2004-5)

Fact Sheet 2005-3128

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Island ecosystems throughout the Pacific have undergone catastrophic species loss, largely due to the effects of alien or non-native species. Rats, in particular, pose significant threats to native species. In Hawai`i, the appearance of rats (which are not native to Hawai`i) in the subfossil record coincides with the disappearance of ground nesting birds. Sadly, only three of Hawai`i?s 10 endemic waterfowl species still exist today. The Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis), also known as the Laysan Teal, is a critically endangered dabbling duck that is restricted to a single population on the remote and rat-free Laysan Island (Fig. 1). The Laysan Duck was listed as an endangered species in 1966 because of its small population, limited distribution, and dependence on a fragile island ecosystem. The same threats identified in 1966 continue to plague the species today.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Translocation of Endangered Laysan Ducks to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (2004-5)
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
2005-3128
Edition:
-
Year Published:
2005
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Contributing office(s):
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
4 p.