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Wild sheep and deer in Hawai'i: a threat to fragile ecosystems

Fact Sheet 2008-3102

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Abstract

The unique native flora of the Hawaiian Islands, which evolved in the absence of ungulates (grazing animals), is highly vulnerable to damage by trampling and browsing. Wild ungulates introduced into Hawai'i in the past 150 years, including mouflon, axis deer, and mule deer, have severely harmed the native flora. Control measures used against feral animals do not work as well against these wild animals. Trophy hunting tends to alter sex ratios and increase population growth. U.S. Geological Survey scientists are studying these wild ungulates in order to develop more effective control measures that help protect Hawai'i's endemic flora.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Wild sheep and deer in Hawai'i: a threat to fragile ecosystems
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
2008-3102
Edition:
Version 1.0
Year Published:
2008
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s):
Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center
Description:
4 p.